900 Oakwood Drive, Eureka, Illinois 61530, United States

(309) 360-9945

Workshops

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Genealogy 101 - Choosing Your Path and Winning the Hunt...

 

This course will instruct you how to begin your family ancestor hunt. You will learn why the very first step begins at home! The class will work with family group sheets and other forms to help keep their information organized. We will discuss several websites

and what the benefits of each are.  In addition to this, we will discuss census records and learn how to trace

all the other schedules that the census has to offer (i.e. Agriculture, Mortality etc.) This class will also touch on Organization,

Maps, Military Records, Oral Histories, Immigration and Repositories that are worth looking in to. Great opportunity to learn

the who, what, why and when of Genealogy!

​IMMIGRANT ANCESTORS: They Didn't Just Come in Ships

 FDR once said, “Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionist!” It might have been better if he had told us something that we didn’t already know! It would have been far more helpful if he had told us where we one day might find the records of these newcomers.
In this course, we will discuss what is needed when searching for immigration papers and what to do when you can’t find the documents you are looking for. This course will provide you with information regarding Foreign Ports of Departure, Historical Background, Strategies for researching Immigrants and Their Origins and how to document an Ancestors Immigration. 

Census Records: Census Clues can Sometimes Confuse

 Anyone who has ever tried to piece together a family history knows about Census Records. What do they really tell us? The first U.S. census was done in 1790 and since that time one has been done every 10 years! This class will discuss not only U.S Federal Census Records but State Census Records as well. You will learn who was counted and why, what questions were asked, which schedules are available for each census, researching special populations and how to put all of this together to learn more about your family! Anyone who has ever tried to piece together a family history knows about Census Records. What do they really tell us? The first U.S. census was done in 1790 and since that time one has been done every 10 years! This class will discuss not only U.S Federal Census Records but State Census Records as well. You will learn who was counted and why, what questions were asked, which schedules are available for each census, researching special populations and how to put all of this together to learn more about your family! 

Institutional Records: The Records Researchers Don't Want to Talk About

 Most of us have heard the family stories about “that” ancestor. You know the one I am talking about. They may have suffered from depression, deformity or simply abject poverty. In many cases, these poor souls were sent and made to live away from their families, their stories lost to us or so we thought. In this course about Institutional Records, we will discuss clues to institutionalization, Almshouses, Poor Farms, Asylums, Orphan Homes, Prisons and Jails and where and how to find these records. 

Occupational Records: Work Hard They Did

 One thing we can depend on when researching our family history is that the majority of the family worked! In this introduction to U.S. occupations, we will discuss the reason an individual’s occupation is such an important aspect of family history as well as resources and repositories to use to help find occupational records. You will learn how to build a profile of an individual’s “working life” and learn how census records can help to find clues regarding employment. 

Genealogy FAN Club: Breaking Down Brick Walls One FAN at a Time

 We all have at least one “brick wall” in our family genealogy.  That one ancestor who seems to have fallen off the ends of the earth. Learn how to use others in your family members circle to track them down! ​

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Newspapers and Genealogy: Moments in Time

 Most family historians have checked newspapers for an ancestor’s obituary but some never know what a gold mine they can be!  This study will not only introduce you to the wealth of information in newspapers but also teach you about finding them. The discussion will include an introduction to U.S. papers, information on specialty newspapers, vital statistics, using indexes, transcripts and abstracts and newspapers on the internet.   

Religious Records: Finding and Using them in your Research

Religious records can provide clues and information that a family historian may not find anywhere else! Join The Joyful Genealogist to learn more about the significant presence of religion as the United States became a country and discover where these records may be found.

Cemetery Records: Where oh Where is my Ancestor Buried

Explore not only the history of cemeteries but learn more about the types of cemeteries that exist and the symbolism used. Learn where and how to find and use these records in your research.

Migration Records: Go West Young Man!

Discover the routes your ancestors may have traveled as they settled the New World. This discussion will include information on the time period of settlements across the US and will include information on specific migration routes.

Probate Records: What our Ancestors Left Behind

Did your ancestor leave a will or was their estate handled by an administrator? Whether they had a will or not, Probate records can provide a unique glimpse into the lives of your predecessors. Learn where and how to locate these records and discover what records are available based on the time in which your ancestor lived.